24-HOUR SALE EXTENSION | Ends July 7th

Days
Hours
Minutes
Seconds
Offer Ends Today

Latest Blog Posts

New Release: Imerge Pro 2021.3

The Imerge team has been hard at work to bring you the next Imerge Pro release just in time for the end of summer. We’ve added 8 new effects, a new-and-improved effects menu, and new ‘effect stack’ presets to speed up your workflow. Keep reading to learn what’s new in Imerge 2021.3.

How to create realistic lens blur and depth in HitFilm

Want to level up the quality of your composites? While not usually the focus of the scene, the type of blur you use in your VFX work can make a huge difference in the overall realism of the shot. In this tutorial, Zach introduces you to the Lens Blur effect and explains how it can be used

How to create a freeze time effect

Inspired by the most iconic scene from The Matrix, the bullet time effect is the best way to capture the most intense action scenes! Today we’re using HitFilm Pro and its built-in Foundry Camera Tracker effect along with footage taken with CamTrackAR to show you how it can be done easily and on a low budget.

Color-corrected-skin-tones-girl-on-street-color-separation

How to color correct skin tones in any NLE

Learning how to color correct skin tones can be a difficult thing to master. Luckily, finding that ‘sweet spot’ is a lot easier than it seems and can be achieved in a few easy steps. In this article, we’ll show you how to color correct skin tones in any NLE.

How to convert 2D images into 3D scenes

Need to get the perfect establishing shot but can’t reach the location you want? Perhaps the weather isn’t on your side? Don’t worry! You can easily turn 2D images into 3D scenes and this week we show you how!

In this tutorial, we will show you how to convert 2D images into 3D scenes, perfect for creating cinematic establishing shots when you’re unable to reach the location!


How to convert 2D images into 3D scenes - isolating the foreground

Begin by creating a new Composite Shot and moving the 2D image onto the timeline. To keep track of the resulting images, rename the current image layer to Foreground.  Go into the freehand mask tool and mask around any of the shapes that are in the foreground to isolate it from the background – in this instance, we masked around the house. The mask for this must be precise as rough edges will make it obvious that the scene is a cut-out. Next, create a Rectangular mask for the bottom of the frame, and position it accordingly. We used a separate mask for the terrain of the foreground so we can vary the feathering.

In the Mask controls, Keep the Feather Strength of the foreground object masks low to preserve the sharp edges; however, for the terrain, increase the Feather Strength so it fades in more drastically.

With the foreground isolated, duplicate the layer and rename the duplicate Midground. Then,  in the Midground layer delete all of the masks. Temporarily hide the Forground layer while working in the Midground layer to be able to better see what you’re doing. As before, begin to mask around the elements that are present in the appropriate depth from the camera – in this instance, these midground elements include the waterline, the near distant mountains, and the tree line. Lastly, duplicate the Midground layer, rename the duplicate Background and delete all of the masks present in the background layer.

How to convert 2D images into 3D scenes - foreground, midground and background layers used for parallax effect

Now that we have isolated the foreground, midground, and background, select the composite shot layers and change them from 2D to 3D – this will automatically create a new Camera. The Foreground layer will remain where it is.  Select the midground layer and go into the controls panel. Under the transform, set the Position to something negative like -500; the exact number depends on the picture you use and how far it should appear from the camera. Because the Midground layer has been pushed back in space, it no longer fills the screen anymore, to rectify this, increase the scale until it looks like it did before. Now for the background layer, doing the same thing, increase how far back it is in Z space. We brought our background back to -1000. As before,  increase the scale to bring the background to the correct size. 

The different layer depths result in a parallax effect when the Camera is moved which is what happens in real life. To move the camera, in the controls panel activate keyframing for the camera’s position. Animate the camera’s position however ensure that you do not go overboard with the amount of movement as too much will give away that the screen is just a compilation of flat picture layers.

And that’s how you create a 3D scene from a 2D image!

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on reddit
Reddit
Hannah Odebode

Hannah Odebode

Hey! I'm Hannah, the intern! I'm the person that gets to answer all of your questions and respond to your lovely comments on our socials. I have a great love for all things thriller/horror-film related and my favorite film as of yet is Parasite. 😊
Hannah Odebode

Hannah Odebode

Hey! I'm Hannah, the intern! I'm the person that gets to answer all of your questions and respond to your lovely comments on our socials. I have a great love for all things thriller/horror-film related and my favorite film as of yet is Parasite. 😊