Hitfilm Planes and etc

Hi,
New, very new to Hitfilm. I got a few questions I'm trying to understand. I know how to use Visionlab. Hitfilm, I dont really understand planes and points and how to keyframe like in visionlab. I know there are a lot of options on Hitfilm, but I need to understand those options so I know how to use them. Anyone got any info or a way to find out these options and some explainging about planes and etc. Thanks to everyone! Chad

Comments

  • Use the tutorials. Explains everything.
  • Yes, Daniboy's comment looks like I don't care about you, but that's the truth, you need to watch tutorials. I do the same. Some tip you can get from the Help, too.
    And when you really stucked, we can help.
  • What are you wondering about planes? Do you not understand what they are? You want to know how to use them? How to edit them?
    Keyframing works exactly the same as in VisionLab, with the exception that you have to turn it on first, rather than it automatically happening whether you want it to or not, as it did in VisionLab. Click the circle to the right of the name of any keyframeable attribute, and it will turn on, Then keyframing will happen automatically for that attribute, just like it would have in VisionLab.
  • Some starting kit here:
    Planes are flat objects. 2 dimensionals, but can be placed in a 3D environment.
    They have x size, y size, but no z size. So, there are only two dimension, even when you layer switched to 3D.
    How to switch:
    On the layer's label there is a flat square, you klick it, magic happens ;)
  • [quote name='Estevez (HUN)' timestamp='1314111147' post='4686']
    Some starting kit here:
    Planes are flat objects. 2 dimensionals, but can be placed in a 3D environment.
    They have x size, y size, but no z size. So, there are only two dimension, even when you layer switched to 3D.
    How to switch:
    On the layer's label there is a flat square, you klick it, magic happens ;)
    [/quote]
    I will watch more of the tutorials! What is a plane? I see what you are saying, can you use a example, once I understand that then it will be easy sailing. I hope :) I had the same problems with visionlab and on the 3rd actual use I had a real neat video, I did way better than most from what I was told for using it only for the 3rd time. Thanks for baring with me and the help! Thanks, Chad

  • What are you wondering about planes? Do you not understand what they are? You want to know how to use them? How to edit them?
    Keyframing works exactly the same as in VisionLab, with the exception that you have to turn it on first, rather than it automatically happening whether you want it to or not, as it did in VisionLab. Click the circle to the right of the name of any keyframeable attribute, and it will turn on, Then keyframing will happen automatically for that attribute, just like it would have in VisionLab.

    The first line you wrote is exactly what I need help with, I understand that, then I will be set!! Thanks for the help! Chad
  • A plane is basically like a sheet of paper inside your composite. Its a solid sheet, for which you can specify the width and height. if they are 2D, then its basically just a rectangle within your frame, but if converted to 3D then they can be moved around and turned, like an actual sheet of paper in front of the camera could be. Although they don't bend like paper.
    The 2D effects available in HitFilm have to be applied to a layer, so one of the most common uses for planes is to hold effects. Say you want to use some lightning. You could just apply it to your footage, but then you can't change the lightning without changing all of the footage it is attached to. Whereas if it is attached to a plane of its own, then you can grade the plane, or move the plane, without affecting the underlying footage at all.

  • A plane is basically like a sheet of paper inside your composite. Its a solid sheet, for which you can specify the width and height. if they are 2D, then its basically just a rectangle within your frame, but if converted to 3D then they can be moved around and turned, like an actual sheet of paper in front of the camera could be. Although they don't bend like paper.
    The 2D effects available in HitFilm have to be applied to a layer, so one of the most common uses for planes is to hold effects. Say you want to use some lightning. You could just apply it to your footage, but then you can't change the lightning without changing all of the footage it is attached to. Whereas if it is attached to a plane of its own, then you can grade the plane, or move the plane, without affecting the underlying footage at all.

    Ok, it's making sense now!! So, if I want to add a light to a sword light a light saber, would that be on a plane?? I know from the missle smoke tutorial how to make 2 of the same thing and parent them together. I was really not sure how to add like fire or smoke to a video of mine, so I would do that on a plane I take it? Thanks!
  • Yes, lightsaber blades, and 2D fire or smoke are all instances where a plane could be used. You could, of course, also apply those effects directly to your footage, but a Plane is another option. For bright effects, generally you would use a black plane, then set its blend mode to Add or Screen. For darker effects like smoke, you might want to use a white plane, and set its blend mode to Multiply.

  • Yes, lightsaber blades, and 2D fire or smoke are all instances where a plane could be used. You could, of course, also apply those effects directly to your footage, but a Plane is another option. For bright effects, generally you would use a black plane, then set its blend mode to Add or Screen. For darker effects like smoke, you might want to use a white plane, and set its blend mode to Multiply.

    Ok get the plane thing now. I hope! LOL! Move on to the next.... A composite shot, not sure why I have to choose this option?? Let me ask, this should help. I got a video and I want to add lets say lightening to my video, what is the best way to do this, but I might want to move the lightening around without messing with my video.. It seems like it is best not to add a plane to the actual video? The other thing is a Points. What are these and when do you use them. Once I get this down then I will be set. Had to go through the same thing with Visionlab. With visionlab, there were DVDs that explain like how to make superhero effects and stuff. Any plans on that happen with Hitfilm? Thanks for your time.. Chad
  • Hi.
    Okay, as soon as you wonna do some more stuff on your footage, like filters, color correction, ... you had to create a composite shot. Then, you can do everything with it as well as keyframe the settings over the time. If you want to do lightning, you had to do this inside a composite shot.
    A point object is just a helper object to do some other stuff. You can use a point as a reference to other, parented objects (i.e. position target). You can also switch the point to be a 3D-object, where a light-layer hotspot is attached to...so the light is available in the 3D space.
    You had to play around with all the possibilites. There's no way to describe every combination of the available effects/filters. You had to understand, how they are working and how to use them together. So take one filter at a time, play with all the available properties and try to combine them with other filters.
    You may also take a look at the available video tutorials of After Effects. Cause HitFilm is basically using the same principle, you can transfer a lot of the stuff to it.
    Regards,
    Marc
  • Composite shots... you can have several of them in a project. They can be embedded (used) in each other, place them several times on other c.shots (repeat). And also they can provide a hierarchy of the main composited video clip, represents compact units to handle.
  • edited August 2011
    Ok get the plane thing now. I hope! LOL! Move on to the next.... A composite shot, not sure why I have to choose this option??
    At the most basic level, HitFilm performs two functions: First, basic video editing, which involves selecting portions of various video clips and placing them one after another on the timeline to create a sequence. This is done, naturally, in the Editor. Second, HitFilm can combine various pieces or elements together, so they happen at the same time. This process is called compositing. Basic compositing could include such things as combining a greenscreen clip with a bit of background footage, or adding a particle effect to a video clip.
    So, any time you want to combine more than one element into a single shot in HitFilm, you use a Composite Shot. Also, if you want to modify any settings applied to a clip over time, using keyframing, then you use a Composite shot to do this.
    I got a video and I want to add lets say lightening to my video, what is the best way to do this, but I might want to move the lightening around without messing with my video.. It seems like it is best not to add a plane to the actual video?
    You can't add a plane to the video, the plane is a separate element. That's the point of the plane, is to be a separate element from the video. You could apply the lightning effect to the video, but then you will be limited to how much you can manipulate the lightning without affecting the video. Whereas if the lightning is applied to a plane instead of the video, then you can manipulate the plane as much as you want, and the video remains unaffected, because it is a totally separate element. Incidentally, lightning does have its own movement controls, and so can be moved independently of the video, even if it is applied to the video layer.
    The other thing is a Points. What are these and when do you use them. Once I get this down then I will be set. Had to go through the same thing with Visionlab. With visionlab, there were DVDs that explain like how to make superhero effects and stuff. Any plans on that happen with Hitfilm? Thanks for your time.. Chad
    Points are specific locations within the compositing space of HitFilm. They cannot be seen, and their primary purpose is that other objects can be attached to them. They can be used to build animation rigs to control complex movement of other objects, or to just simplify and speed up animation.
    As far as tutorial videos, several of us have been working on them every chance we get, and releasing them as quickly as possible. Once we have enough done to cover all the basics of the software, then likely a DVD will be made available, yes. However, all of the tutorials are free to view online as they are released, on our YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/FXhomeHitFilm
    A number of the tutorials we have done thus far involve planes and points in creating various effects, so I encourage you to have a look to see how these tools can be used in practical cases.
  • To everyone, thanks for the learning lesson, now I get it!! Thanks!
  • Yes, THANK YOU!!!! This thread has been VERY helpful in understanding how HF works. I'm sure I'll have other questions in the future but for now I'm going to try some things I learned here. THANKS AGAIN!!!!!
  • SimonKJonesSimonKJones Moderator
    edited August 2011
    We're going to be putting out more 'getting started' videos all the way through the rest of the year, so make sure you subscribe to the YouTube channel. I know Axel's hard at work creating cool new content that will go through a lot of these core concepts: planes, points, keyframing etc.
    HitFilm is not only the biggest product we've ever developed, it's also a major challenge showing people how to use it - not because it's difficult but because there are so many options and possibilities. As you can see from the tutorials we've already put up, we're mixing getting started tutorials with more advanced techniques.
    In case you're not aware, you can find all the tutorials on our YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/fxhomehitfilm
    I'd also like to thank all of you for posting in this topic and helping out guitar74 and others. We set up this forum and community specifically so that people can work together to get the most out of HitFilm and filmmaking in general, so it's great to see that already happening!
  • That's great info, Simon! I've been feeling like I'm on the cusp of understanding but haven't quite gotten there. Sure, I can duplicate what someone shows in a video/tutorial [monkey see monkey do] but success with venturing out on my own hasn't been the most fruitful......yet.
    I think the most trouble I've had understanding is knowing when to use what....i.e. duplicate or create new comp or add a plane. A little push down that road would go a long way. Axel's explainations above helped me understand more than the reference manual did so I look forward to his tutorials.
    And as a side note, you guys aren't snooty or talk down to people. I really appreciate that 'cause it's gonna be a long time before I go back to AE's site. Those folks just expect you to know and comprehend everything right off the bat and if you don't their replies can get down right snarky.....at least the ones I dealt with. You guys are down to earth and are always encouraging. I hope the rest of the community sees it that way as well. Keep up the great work and THANK YOU!

  • We're going to be putting out more 'getting started' videos all the way through the rest of the year, so make sure you subscribe to the YouTube channel. I know Axel's hard at work creating cool new content that will go through a lot of these core concepts: planes, points, keyframing etc.
    HitFilm is not only the biggest product we've ever developed, it's also a major challenge showing people how to use it - not because it's difficult but because there are so many options and possibilities. As you can see from the tutorials we've already put up, we're mixing getting started tutorials with more advanced techniques.
    In case you're not aware, you can find all the tutorials on our YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/fxhomehitfilm
    I'd also like to thank all of you for posting in this topic and helping out guitar74 and others. We set up this forum and community specifically so that people can work together to get the most out of HitFilm and filmmaking in general, so it's great to see that already happening!

    Thanks to everyone and Simon and the rest of the HF team for helping out. I get shown one time how to do this amazing stuff and that Is all I need to get going and from there it is what I can come up with and I got a lot of good ideas.. Same thing I had to be shown with V-Lab and the 3rd attempt I made a really neat video, but the camera was moving and it was hell to put effects in it!! I have to add this I raelly appericate all the help from the users, Hf staff, and Simon, (Hope I have not drove you crazy with the 2000 questions yet), LOL!! Thanks for the help and info!! :) Simon when you or the staff make a tutorial, are you filming that with a camera or how is that happening?
  • edited August 2011
    When we create the official tutorials, we use Screen capture software to record everything that happens onscreen, rather than pointing a camera at the screen, which typically doesn't give as clean of results. In particular, we are all using Camtasia, but there are lots of other similar programs out there, including some free options such as Fraps and BB FlashBack Express, and some of the other users putting out tutorials, like RodyPolis and Majahr Pictures, are using some of these free options quite successfully.
    There is also a bit of video editing after recording, of course, to add the titles and so forth, and trim out some of the mistakes (gasp!) and keep the pacing brisk.

  • You may also take a look at the available video tutorials of After Effects. Cause HitFilm is basically using the same principle, you can transfer a lot of the stuff to it.

    One thing to note, if you watch AE tutorials, when they talk about a "solid", that's basically the same thing as a "plane" in HitFilm. Video Copilot has a lot of good tutorials for AE. Watching those will give you a good idea of what working in layers is all about. And much of it will translate to HitFilm as well.
  • And as a side note, you guys aren't snooty or talk down to people. I really appreciate that 'cause it's gonna be a long time before I go back to AE's site. Those folks just expect you to know and comprehend everything right off the bat and if you don't their replies can get down right snarky.....at least the ones I dealt with. You guys are down to earth and are always encouraging. I hope the rest of the community sees it that way as well. Keep up the great work and THANK YOU!

    Thanks, Stormy! Making HitFilm has been a huge learning curve for us over the last few years, so we understand what it's like. :)
    I think with everybody there's a tipping point, somewhere, after which you can go off on your own and figure out pretty much everything. It's that initial chunk of understanding that is the tricky bit, where nothing seems to make sense - once you get over that initial hill, you can then take what you know and apply it to different effects and features and improvise without needing to ask questions.
  • edited August 2011

    It's that initial chunk of understanding that is the tricky bit, where nothing seems to make sense - once you get over that initial hill, you can then take what you know and apply it to different effects and features and improvise without needing to ask questions.

    EXACTLY!
    By the way: my last name is Hill and it IS rather hard getting over myself.
    :))

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