Linux OS for a new user

Hello users,

This question may be offtopic here, but i need your kind suggestions. I am now going to reinstall an operating system in my computer.
I had Windows 10 earlier. Now I am thinking to use Linux. I have not used it before so I have a few doubts.

Will it be difficult to use and understand Linux?
Will Linux be faster than Winodows 10?

Thanks

Comments

  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator

    Not really the correct forum for this topic. The key thing is Linux is NOT Windows and you will not be able to run any Windows software under Linux - including Hitfilm.

    So changing your OS from Windows to Linux probably means replacing every program you have with a Linux equivalent.

    Because of the nature of the question you've asked, my advice is to not do it. If you put a totally unfamiliar OS on your machine that you know absolutely nothing about you're just going to get yourself into trouble.... Since you'll have an OS and no software to run under it.

    @NormanPCN @Stargazer54 please help me save bkdroid from himself? Or correct me if I'm wrong!

  • edited June 6

    (Side note: @Triem23 this thread should probably be under "Everything Else", right?)

    @bkdroid13 if you are new to the Linux world and are only familiar with Windows, I would personally recommend not switching outright until you have tried it a bit.

    I first installed Linux on my computer about 3 years ago, with the intention of quitting Windows for good - it's taken me until this year to stop using Windows, and I still have a spare hard drive with Windows 7 installed on it.

    It is possible to have multiple OS's (for example Windows and a Linux distro) installed on the same computer at the same time, by using multiple hard drives or by using different partitions in the same hard drive. Google something along the lines of "dual-boot Linux and Windows" and you will probably find some useful information.

     

    In terms of which Linux distro to try, I'd suggest Linux Mint - the desktop environment has a similar UI to windows and it's overall been designed to have things work "out-of-the-box".

  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator

    Yeah, for whatever reason, right now I'm not seeing the Mod control to edit the subforum assignment. Keeps taking me to Create new Discussion.

  • edited June 6

    With regard to software, and how easy (or hard) that will make it to switch OS, it depends what you're already using.

    For open-source software like Blender, LibreOffice, VLC player, Audacity, OBS, Handbrake, Firefox, Mediainfo, FFmpeg, all that stuff will be exactly the same as on Windows. Some of those programs will actually work better on Linux.

    For proprietary software, some of it will be available for Linux (e.g. Google Chrome), some of it won't. Some stuff will have open-source alternatives that are just as good (e.g. LibreOffice will do the same things as Microsoft Office), some stuff won't. (There are many Linux music players/music libraries, but IMO none of them comes close to Apple's iTunes.)

    Some companies will make their software available on Linux, but only support one specific distro (e.g. DaVinci Resolve is supported only on RHEL (and CentOS), although it can be made to run on other Linux distros)

    For games, Steam is your friend. Cross-platform games will run in Steam the same as they would run in Windows, and Valve is actively developing their own fork of Wine (they call it Proton) with the goal of allowing some Windows-only games to be played using Steam on Linux.

    There is also Wine, which is a compatibility layer for running Windows software on Linux. Works great for some things, doesn't work at all for others.

     

    With regard to FXHOME software specifically, none of their software is available for Linux. It is possible to run Action Pro and HitFilm in Wine (although not without problems), but Imerge will not run at all (and PhotoKey8 won't even install).

  • Thank you very much guys for your extensive answer!

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